Different Uses of 1, 2, 3 in Slovene

As we know, numbers  can be used in an infinity of distinct situations. The simple numbers 1, 2, 3 in Slovene can also take many different and interesting forms as well.

Sometimes, it doesn’t follow the “logical” order, therefore, you need to remember by <3. It will be marked in red.

One, Two, Three

General Form
The general form of numbersštevilke, is the most basic and simple form: ena, dva, tri, štiri, pet. It is usually used for counting such as for age (koliko si star)or price (koliko stane).

Keep in mind that due to different genders, amounts and skloni, the nouns and adjectives might take a different forms.

There’s different way to count. To say “this is/these are…”, we say “to je/sta/so…1en stol(m), dva stola, trije/štirje stoli, pet stolov. To say I have…“, we say “imam4en stol, dva stola, tri/štiri stole, pet stolov.

One o’clock, Two o’clock, Three o’clock

Time
Depending on the question what time is itkolika je ura or whenkdaj, the answer will be different.  Keep in mind that prepositions in Slovene are very important.

For “kolika je ura“, the answer is “ura je…1ena, dve, tri.
For “kdaj“, the answer is “ob…5*enih, dveh, treh, štirih, petih.

For half hours, the adverb “pol” is used, and it’s with the second sklon – genitive.  And that, no matter of the question. For example, 12:30 is pol enih, 1:30 is pol dveh, 2:30 is pol treh, 3:30 is pol štirih and 4:30 is pol petih.

To indicate half past, quarter past and so on, the preposition “čez” is used and it’s with the fourth sklon – accusative. For example, 10:05 is pet (minut) čez deset.

On the other hand, to say “till” one, the preposition “do” is used and it’s with the second sklon – genitive. For example, 9:55 is pet (minut) do desetih.

Once, Twice, Three time

Frequency
In Slovene, frequency are easy to express. Simply by adding -krat at the end of the number will do the trick. For example, once, twice, three time is enkrat, dvakrat, trikrat. This “rules” also apply with adverb, such as večkrat (multiple time) or velikokrat (many times). And if you want to say “one more time“, it is še enkrat.

First, Second, Third

Order and Rank
Just like in English, ordinal numbers in Slovene takes a different form: prvi, drugi, tretji, četrti, peti.

Date
It is also used for dates. For example, January 1st is prvi januarJanuary 2nd is drugi januarJanuary 3rd is tretji januar.

 With dates, to say “today is…”, we say “danes je prvi januar1“. To say “today, we are…”, we say “danes, smo prvega januarja2.

How to say dates and times in Slovene

Ranked Frequency
Ordinal numbers can also be used for ranked frequency by adding a at the end. First time, second time, third time and last time is prvič, drugič, tretjič and zadnjič.


There are so many different and interesting ways to use 1, 2, 3 in Slovene. If you have any questions, comments or more ideas of use, don’t hesitate to share it with me!


Discover more Slovene “lessons” that might interest you: Slovene Numbers & NumeralsSlovene Nouns & PronounsSlovene VerbsSlovene AdjectivesSlovene SyntaxSlovenian Idioms, Slovene Adverbs.

Let’s learn,
Anna.

Numbers in General – Številke

Numbers – številke, in Slovene is not very hard. All you need to know is a few basics. Keep reading to understand all about numbers in Slovene.

Few things  to remember:

  • Know the number from 1 to 10.
  • Know the number 0, 10, 20, 100, 1000, 1.000.000 and 1.000.000.000.
  • Count reversely.

Zero to Nineteen

0

NIČ

10

DESET

1

ena

11

enajst

2

dva

12

dvanajst

3

tri

13

trinajst

4

štiri

14

štirinajst

5

pet

15

petnajst

6

šest

16

šestnajst

7

sedem

17

sedemnajst

8

osem

18

osemnajst

9

devet

19

devetnajst

As you can see, 11 to 19 is basically 1 to 9 + najst.

For example,
12 is dva (2) + najst = dva-najst → dvanajst,
19 is devet (9) + najst = devet-najst → devetnajst.

The audio files (1-9 and 10-19) are a courtesy of my friend Jure from Slovenian Word Of The Day.  Check his website for more vocabulary words!

Twenty and On

20

DVAJSET

30

trideset

21

enaindvajset

31

enaintrideset

22

dvaindvajset

40

štirideset

23

triindvajset

41

enainštirideset

24

štiriindvajset

50

petdeset

25

petindvajset

51

enainpetdeset

Do you notice the pattern?

Let me show you,
20 is dvajset,
21 is ena (1) + in (and) + dvajset (20) = ena-in-dvajset enaindvajset,
28 is osem (8) + in (and) + dvajset (20) = osem-in-dvajset osemindvajset.

Compared to English, Slovene numbers are said reversed.

For example,
in English – 21 is twenty (20) + one (1) = twenty-one,
in Slovene – 21 is ena (1) + in (and) + dvajset (20) = ena-in-dvajset → enaindvajset.


30 is trideset, the litteral translation would be “three ten”.

Looking closer,
37 is sedem (7) + in (and) + trideset (30) = sedem-in-trideset → sedemintrideset.


Once we reached 99, devetindevetdeset
100 is sto, 200 is dvesto, 300 is tristo, 400 is štiristo, 500 is petsto… and so on.

For example,
999 is devetsto devetindevetdeset.

Then we’ve reached…
1000 is tisoč, 2000 is dva tisoč, 3000 is tri tisoč

9999 is devettisoč devetsto devetindevetdeset.


1.000.000 is milijon, 2.000.000 is dva milijona, 3.000.000 is tri milijoni
1.000.000.000 is milijarda, 2.000.000.000 is dve milijardi, 3.000.000.000 is tri milijarde


Now, now, numbers in Slovene is not that hard, right?

Here’s some exercise for you:

  1. 27
  2. 3659
  3. 20.891
  4. 786.980
  5. 4.999.999

You can post the answers via the comment box to see if you got it right or not. If you have any questions, be sure to ask me.


Discover more Slovene “lessons” that might interest you: Slovene Numbers & Numerals, Slovene Nouns & Pronouns, Slovene Verbs, Slovene AdjectivesSlovene SyntaxSlovenian Idioms.

Let’s learn,
Anna.