Understanding Slovenian Idioms #008

An interesting and playful way to discover Slovene as a language is by learning the idioms. Some doesn’t seem to make much sense at first, but what’s more significant is to understand the meaning behind the words!

  • Imeti maslo na glavi – To have butter on the head
    It doesn’t actually mean to have butter on the head, but instead, it means to be guilty of something – like to have a guilty conscience.
  • Skakati čez plot – To jump over the fence
    It doesn’t refer to an innocent athletics action as to jump over the fence, but it actually means to be cheating in marriage. s not to jump “over” the fence, just across the fence, which means to
  • Ugrizniti v kislo jabolko – To bite into a sour apple
    It is obviously not very pleasant to bite into a sour apple instead of a sweet one – it means having to deal with something unpleasant or to go ahead and “bite the bullet”.

Discover more Slovene “lessons” that might interest you: Slovene Numbers & NumeralsSlovene Nouns & PronounsSlovene VerbsSlovene AdjectivesSlovene SyntaxSlovenian IdiomsSlovene Adverbs.

Understanding Slovenian Idioms #007

A casual and engaging method to learn Slovene is to master the Slovenian idioms. Knowing the theory is one thing, but actually applying it is another. But the day that you will, you can be very proud!

  • Zaradi dreves ne videti gozda – Because of the trees, can’t see the forest
    Personally, I think that this idiom is beautifully so written. It means that if you look at each tree individually, then you can’t see the larger forest (which is formed by trees). The deeper meaning is that because of individuality, you lose the perception of a whole.
  • Rasti kot gobe (po dežju) – To grow like mushrooms (after the rain)
    With some imagination, I find this idiom very amusing. The meaning points at a very very fast growth (or multiplication), like mushrooms after the rain. It can be use to describe a massive crowd of tourists during holidays, or money after an excellent investment.
  • Govoriti kot dež – To talk like the rain
    How does the rain talk, like a quiet mist or a crazy deluge? In this case, it means to talk at a very fast rate or to talk a lot – so, the latter one. You can try to imagine a sudden downpour of heavy rain… but made of words.

Discover more Slovene “lessons” that might interest you: Slovene Numbers & NumeralsSlovene Nouns & PronounsSlovene VerbsSlovene AdjectivesSlovene SyntaxSlovenian Idioms, Slovene Adverbs.

Discover Slovenian Facts #001

Hey guys,
the other day, after putting both kids to sleep, I was enjoying a nice hamburger from McDonald’s (yes, sometimes I do miss the awesome  junk food…) while randomly watching TV – a Slovenian Quiz Show called “Joker” on RTV Slo.


One question in particular caught my attention.

Kaj ni eno od tradicionalnih slovenskih imen za steklenico za strežbi vina?
(Which is not a traditional Slovenian name for bottle for serving wine?)

Possible answer : Martin, Neža, Urban or Marjeta.


Personally, I’m not a wine drinker or connoisseur, but it still picked my curiosity. I had no idea that in Slovenia, bottles had “names”.  So I did a little research, and it’s true!

The traditional name for Slovenian bottle, especially for wine is Štefan, and it has a volume of 2 liters. Other names are:

  • Polič for 0,75L bottle,
  • Janez or Neža for 3L bottle,
  • Urban for 4L bottle,
  • Martin for 5L bottle,
  • Pic for 100L bottle and
  • Bok for 250L bottle.

We can learn so many stuff by watching the right TV programs! “Joker” or similar shows are indeed of one the best way to learn something random but interesting about Slovenia! Hope you enjoyed!


Discover more Slovene “lessons” that might interest you: Slovene Numbers & NumeralsSlovene Nouns & PronounsSlovene VerbsSlovene AdjectivesSlovene SyntaxSlovenian IdiomsSlovene Adverbs.

Let’s discover together,
Anna.

Slovenian Dialects on RTV Slo

Hey guys,
I’ve been quite busy with hay, but now that it’s rainy, I get to rest a little bit.

The other day, between two batches of hay, I came across a very interesting documentary series and thought to share with you guys : Slovenska narečja – Slovenian dialects on RTV Slo. Although, there are no subtitles, it can still be fun to watch.

As we know, there are around 50 dialects in Slovenia, divided into 7 regions. Some dialects are so different that it wouldn’t be weird if two Slovenians from two different regions wouldn’t entirely understand each others. 😛

What about us, foreign learners? …haha.

Until next time,
Anna.

What brings luck to Slovenians?

Depending on the culture, there are many beliefs that certain things bring luck, while other bring bad luck – it is the same for Slovenians.

Holding a button when meeting the dimnikar brings luck

Dimnikar (chimney sweeper) is a very important profession in Slovenia, because many house burn logs as a main source of heat. Therefore, it is important that the chimney is cleaned and inspected.

I’ve been told that if I hold a button when the chimney sweeper comes, then something good will happen on the same day! Unfortunately, I always forget to wear something with a button when it’s time for inspection… (lol).

Seeing a spider in the house brings luck

Personally, I do not like  pajki (spiders) at all, especially inside the house. I just have this pressing urge to smack them right away. Until one day, as I was about to get rid of one, my Slovenian mother-in-law told me that spiders found in the house were believed to bring luck for a short period of time.

All I can say is… the spider got really lucky on that day.

Hearing the cuckoo brings money

One year while on a walk with my Slovenian mother-in-law, we heard koo-koo koo-koo and she told me that she doesn’t have a coin with her. I was like… uh? Apparently,  there’s a belief around that too.

If you have a coin in your pocket the first time of the year that you hear the sound of the cuckoo, then you will have enough money for the upcoming year!


From now on, for the sake of luck and money, are you going to always wear something with a button, let spiders make webs in your house or carry a coin with you? Do you know any other similar beliefs? If you so, you are welcomed to share them with me via comments!

Until next lucky round,
Anna.

Understanding Slovenian Idioms #006

Every language has idioms and expressions, Slovene is no different. Compared to grammar, learning idioms is a funnier and more practical way to use daily Slovene. It is also a creative way to get familiar with the Slovenian culture and heritage!

  • Odkriti Ameriko – To discover America
    It doesn’t mean to go on a trip to  America as a trip, but like Columbus: to discover something new.
  • Španska vas – Spanish village
    Where exactly do you look for a Spanish village on a map? Actually, it doesn’t refer to a specific place, but somewhere that is completely unknown (to you).
  • Narediti se Francoza – To make oneself French
    It doesn’t refer to getting a French citizenship or residency, not even having the lifestyle of a French. It simply means to do something stupid or to act indifferent.

The audio file is a courtesy of my friend Jure from Slovenian Word Of The Day.  You can listen to his explanation of vocabulary words, such as vas, on his website.

Discover more Slovene “lessons” that might interest you: Slovene Numbers & NumeralsSlovene Nouns & PronounsSlovene VerbsSlovene AdjectivesSlovene SyntaxSlovenian Idioms, Slovene Adverbs.

Let’s speak like Slovenians,
Anna.

Every Day with Slovenian Idioms #002

The best way to understand and remember Slovenian idioms is to integrate and use them in every day situations, when possible and appropriate.

For example, one afternoon, my daughter woke up from her nap and my mother-in-law smiled and said to her:

  • Gledaš kot miška iz moke – You look like a mouse from the flour
    When I heard it the first time, I was like… What?! The image that instantly pooped into my mind: all white and two little black eyes. It’s a cute way to say that she just woke up and all we could see were her tiny eyes.

Another day, my daughter was playing on her play mat and we heard “puu-pu-pu” then my mother-in-law laughed and said:

  • hahaha stresaš orehe – hahaha you are dropping nuts
    I was like… Uh, did I understanding it right?! Because, sometimes some Slovene words just sound very similar. I understood it right, and it really means “dropping nuts”. What an adorable way to say that she farted. 😛

I can’t wait to find out more cute and adorable idioms to use with children!


Discover more Slovene “lessons” that might interest you: Slovene Numbers & NumeralsSlovene Nouns & PronounsSlovene VerbsSlovene AdjectivesSlovene SyntaxSlovenian Idioms, Slovene Adverbs.

Let’s speak like Slovenians,
Anna.

Cloudy Easter Monday in Logarska Dolina

Recently, the weather has been a mix of sun, clouds, wind and rain, but I can’t really complain because it makes the grass happy. 🙂 Despite the uncertain weather, we decided to take advantage of the day off and go on izlet in Logarska DolinaLogar Valley.

Located in the Kamnik Alps, Logarska Dolina is one of the most beautiful glacial valleys in Europe. The valley consists of a few touristic farms and it is an ideal destination for those who wants to taste self-sustained local products and hikes.

Entrance of Logarska Dolina

Entrance of Logarska Dolina

At the entrance of the valley, a herd of beautiful Highland cows are peacefully eating grass, next to the Kapela Kristusa Kralja – Chapel of Christ the King, designed by the famous Slovenian architect Jože Plečnik.

The drive to Logarska Dolina was decently long and on curvy roads. By the time we arrived, we were famished. We randomly pick a place to eat and had a fantastic homey lunch at Penzion Kmečka hiša Ojstrica – pension Country house Ojstrica, near the entrance of the valley.

At the far end of the Logarska Dolina is the impressive Slap Rinka – Rinka waterfall. A waterfall of 105 m height with a single 90 m drop.

Rinka Slap and Eagle's Nest

Rinka Slap and Eagle’s Nest

Slap Rinka is the source of the Savinja River, which flows through the Savinjska region of Slovenia and almost as soon as it hits the bottom, its water goes underground and reappears as Izvir Črne – Spring of Črna, in the lower part of the valley. Next to Slap Rinka is a little rest spot, the Orlovo Gnezdo – Eagle’s Nest, that serves drinks and ice cream.

I was curious about how the bottom of the waterfall looked like, so we went all the way to the feet of the waterfall, with the mix of water and wind, we got wet so quickly! It must be very refreshing during hot summer days, but not that day. 😉

Until next time,
Anna.

Every Day with Slovenian Idioms #001

A great way to discover and integrated into the Slovenian culture is through its idioms. And they are everywhere in my daily life.

Recently, we’ve been doing some significant shopping and indeed, price, quality and needs are three important factors. Then, the other day, my husband told me:

  • Nisem dovolj bogat, da bi poceni kupoval –  I am not rich enough that I would buy cheap things
    At first, I found it quite contradictory because, logically, if you are tight on money, you would tend buy cheaper things, no?

But what we should really understand from it is that “I am not rich enough that I can afford to buy it again”, with the logic that “cheaper” things are not good quality and will break faster, thus needing to be replace.

Therefore, nisem dovolj bogata da, bi poceni kupovala.


Discover more Slovene “lessons” that might interest you: Slovene Numbers & NumeralsSlovene Nouns & PronounsSlovene VerbsSlovene AdjectivesSlovene SyntaxSlovenian Idioms, Slovene Adverbs.

Let’s speak like Slovenians,
Anna.

Understanding Slovenian Idioms #005

A fun way to explore the Slovenian culture is by getting familiar with its idioms, which is the essence of the language. Through the idioms, we can understand part of the Slovenian culture and heritage.

  • Kaditi kot Turek – To smoke like a Turk
    It doesn’t point at a manner or any special way that a Turk smokes – it simply means to smoke a lot!
  • Brez muje se še čevelj ne obuje – Without effort you can’t put a shoes on
    To achieve anything, it requires some efforts (even the simple task of putting a shoe on).
  • Biti copata – To be a slipper
    (What can being a slipper possibly mean… 😛 ) In Slovene, “being a slipper” is used to describe someone who is submissive or bent at will.

Discover more Slovene “lessons” that might interest you: Slovene Numbers & NumeralsSlovene Nouns & PronounsSlovene VerbsSlovene AdjectivesSlovene SyntaxSlovenian Idioms, Slovene Adverbs.

Let’s speak like Slovenians,
Anna.